Empty Hand Forms

  Siu Nim Tau (Little Idea) “小念头
 
This is the first empty hand form of Wing Tsun and its name translates into “Little Idea”. The principles, concepts and techniques found in Siu Nim Tau are the foundation upon which a one's Wing Tsun proficiency and mastery are built. This form teaches the student the basic adduction stance (Yee Jee Kim Yueng Ma “二字拑羊马”), the form and structure of the hand techniques, the concept of the centre line and the concept of using the elbow to power the techniques.
 
When performing this form, one should concentrate on being relaxed and ensuring the techniques are precise and flow smoothly from one to the other. One should also focus on being rooted to the ground and having the techniques of the upper body connected to the adduction stance by sinking the elbow and the shoulder.
 
Finally, 2 mottoes of Wing Tsun relating to Siu Nim Tau spring to mind; Practice Once a Day “一日念一躺” and More Will Do No Harm “念多亦无妨”.

 

Chum Kiu (Seeking the Bridge) “寻桥
 
This is the intermediate empty hand form and its name translates into “Seeking the Bridge”. The main concept that Chum Kiu imparts is the idea of defining one’s relationship with an opponent, in particular their bridge-arms so as to better detect and dissolve an incoming attack. This form teaches the student footwork, kicks, whole-body coordination and the concept of the moving centre-line.
 
When performing this form, one should concentrate on performing the movements smoothly, having techniques flow from one to the next, synchronizing the movements of the upper and lower body and maintaining stability, balance and rootedness.

 
  Biu Tze (Thrusting Fingers) “标指
 
This is the most advanced empty hand form of the Wing Tsun system and its name translates into “Thrusting Fingers”. Traditionally, Biu Jee is taught only to “closed-door” students who have proven their sincerity, loyalty and trustworthiness. So closely guarded is this form that a Wing Tsun proverb states that Biu Jee does not Leave the Door “标指不出门”. 
 
This form teaches the student the concept of generating “flexible power”, using attacks as defence and regaining the centerline in emergency situations. When performing this form, one should concentrate on maintaining the appropriate speed for that part of the form and using the joints and whole-body coordination to generate power.
 

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